Tag Archives: pork

Not Your Every Day Smoked Pork Spare Ribs

Not Your Every Day Smoked Pork Spare Ribs

Not Your Every Day Smoked Pork Spare Ribs

 

 

Ingredients

6 whole racks of pork spareribs

Dry rub:

1/2 cup packed brown sugar

2 tablespoons chili powder

1 tablespoon paprika

1 tablespoon freshly ground black pepper

2 tablespoons garlic powder

2 teaspoons onion powder

2 teaspoons kosher salt

2 teaspoons ground cumin

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper or to taste (optional)

Mop Sauce:

1 cup apple cider

3/4 cup apple cider vinegar

1 tablespoon onion powder

1 tablespoon garlic powder

2 tablespoons lemon juice

1 jalapeno pepper, finely chopped (optional)

2 tablespoons hot pepper sauce

kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

2 cups wood chips, soaked (Sycamore has an absolutely phenomenal flavor)

Directions

In a medium bowl, mix together the brown sugar, chili powder, paprika, black pepper, 2 tablespoons garlic powder, 2 teaspoons onion powder, kosher salt, cumin, cinnamon, jalapeno seasoning, and cayenne pepper. Rub generously onto the pork spareribs. Cover, and refrigerate for at least 4 hours, or overnight.

Prepare an outdoor grill for indirect heat, or preheat a smoker to 250 degrees F (120 degrees C). While the grill heats up, prepare the mop sauce. In a medium bowl, stir together the apple cider, apple cider vinegar, 1 tablespoon onion powder, 1 tablespoon garlic powder, lemon juice, jalapeno, hot pepper sauce, salt and pepper.

When the coals are gray and ashed over place 2 handfuls of soaked woodchips directly on the coals. Place the ribs on the grill grate bone side down. Cover, and cook for 3 1/2 to 4 hours. Add more coals as needed. Baste with the mop sauce, and throw handfuls of soaked woodchips onto the coals every hour. Keep the temperature of the grill or smoker from going below 225 degrees F (110 degrees C). Ribs are done when the rub has created a wonderful crispy blackened ‘bark’, and the meat has pulled away from the bone. Discard any leftover mop sauce.

Serving Suggestion:

 

 

Advertisements

Chile and Cocoa Rubbed Boneless Pork Chops

Chile and Cocoa Rubbed Boneless Pork Chops

Chile-and-Cocoa–Rubbed Boneless Pork Chops

Chef Bob rubs meat with a bit of sugar to help brown it but finishes the dish over low heat so the sugar does not char the outside. Here, he coats pork chops with cocoa and chile powders for a rub that is like a deconstructed version of Mexican mole’ sauce. YUM!

 

Ingredients

 

2 cold quarts water

1 1/2 teaspoons crushed red pepper

Kosher salt, fresh ground pepper to taste

4 1 1/2-inch-thick boneless pork loin chops

1 tablespoon unsweetened cocoa powder

1 tablespoon light brown sugar

1 tablespoon pure ancho chile powder

Extra-virgin olive oil, for brushing

Directions

 

1 In a large bowl, combine the (cold) water with the red pepper and 1 1/2 teaspoons of salt 1/2 teaspoon fresh ground pepper and stir until the salt dissolves. Add the pork chops and let brine at room temperature for 1 hour.

2 Light a grill and create a cool zone. (For a charcoal grill, rake the coals to one side; for a gas grill, leave one side unlit.) In a bowl, mix the cocoa, sugar and ancho powder with 1 tablespoon of salt.

3 Drain the pork chops and pat dry, removing any bits of crushed pepper. Brush generously with olive oil. Roll the pork chops in the cocoa rub and pat to help it adhere. Grill over moderately high heat for 4 minutes, turning the chops once or twice until lightly browned. Transfer the chops to the cool zone, cover and grill for about 15 minutes, until an instant-read thermometer inserted in the center of the chops registers 135 degrees for medium meat. Let the chops rest for 10 minutes before serving.

 

 

 

Not Your Every Day Smoked Pork Spare Ribs

Not Your Every Day Smoked Pork Spare Ribs

Not Your Every Day Smoked Pork Spare Ribs

Pork Ribs have a long tradition in the old style world of barbecue, ranking with brisket and pulled pork in the competitions as a true art form.  They are marinated in a dry rub, then smoked low and slow, the sauce is added near the end and sizzled on. Just like the champion pitmasters and the best ribjoints do it.

Ribs are the holy grail. Mastering them marks the difference between the tyro, pyro, and pitmaster.  We’re talking Southern ribs here, a style created by early African Americans and as uniquely American as their other great contributions to our culture: Jazz the Blues, Cajun and Creole Soulfood.

A complex spice rub, elegant hardwood smoke, tangy sweet sauce, all underpinned and held together by the distinct flavor of pork. They are juicy and tender and they tug cleanly off the bone but don’t fall off the bone. Their scent clings to your fingers for hours

 

 

Ingredients

6 whole racks of St. Louis cut pork spareribs

Dry rub:

1/2 cup packed brown sugar

2 tablespoons chili powder

1 tablespoon paprika

1 tablespoon freshly ground black pepper

2 tablespoons garlic powder

2 teaspoons onion powder

2 teaspoons kosher salt

2 teaspoons ground cumin

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper or to taste (optional)

Mop Sauce:

1 cup apple cider

3/4 cup apple cider vinegar

1 tablespoon onion powder

1 tablespoon garlic powder

2 tablespoons lemon juice

1 jalapeno pepper, finely chopped (optional)

2 tablespoons hot pepper sauce

kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

2 cups wood chips, soaked (Sycamore has an absolutely phenomenal flavor)

Directions

In a medium bowl, mix together the brown sugar, chili powder, paprika, black pepper, 2 tablespoons garlic powder, 2 teaspoons onion powder, kosher salt, cumin, cinnamon, jalapeno seasoning, and cayenne pepper. Rub generously onto the pork spareribs. Cover, and refrigerate for at least 4 hours, or overnight.

Prepare an outdoor grill for indirect heat, or preheat a smoker to 250 degrees F (120 degrees C). While the grill heats up, prepare the mop sauce. In a medium bowl, stir together the apple cider, apple cider vinegar, 1 tablespoon onion powder, 1 tablespoon garlic powder, lemon juice, jalapeno, hot pepper sauce, salt and pepper.

When the coals are gray and ashed over place 2 handfuls of soaked woodchips directly on the coals. Place the ribs on the grill grate bone side down. Cover, and cook for 3 1/2 to 4 hours. Add more coals as needed. Baste with the mop sauce, and throw handfuls of soaked woodchips onto the coals every hour. Keep the temperature of the grill or smoker from going below 225 degrees F (110 degrees C). Ribs are done when the rub has created a wonderful crispy blackened ‘bark’, and the meat has pulled away from the bone. Discard any leftover mop sauce.  Total smoking/cooking time 5 to 7 hours, depending on the number of slabs you have.

Serving Suggestion :

  or this  or even this! 

%d bloggers like this: