Category Archives: Healthy

Ajeen Jerk BBQ Lamb Ribs

Ajeen Jerk BBQ Lamb Ribs

Ajeen Jerk BBQ Lamb Ribs    Smoked and BBQed Lamb Ribs  lamb ribs (230x230)

Prep Time: 15 mins  Total Time: 1 hour 15 mins  Serves: 10, Yield: 8 pieces

About This Recipe

“The finest ingredients of the Caribbean prepared beautifully and complement the perfect lamb”

Ingredients

5 lbs. lamb ribs

Lamb Marinade

1 tablespoon red chili pepper flakes

3 garlic cloves

1 ounce grated ginger

2 ounces chopped onions

2 tablespoons olive oil

1 ounce spring fresh basil

1/4 teaspoon salt & pepper, to taste

1 ounce spring thyme Sauce

3 ounces chopped onions

3 cloves garlic cloves

1/2 cup tomato ketchup

2 tablespoons vegetable oil

8 ounces hot sauce ( sambol oelek)

8 ounces brown sugar

2 ounces lemon juice

2 tablespoons honey

1 tablespoon soya sauce

1/4 cup pineapple juice

1 tablespoon Jamaican jerk spice

Directions

1.Wash and season lamb with salt and pepper, combine marinade seasoning and marinate lamb for an hour or more.

2.In a thick pot bring lamb to a boil with marinate and water. Add more salt and pepper if necessary to water. Allow lamb rib to cook for 45 min or until tender.

Directions

3.In a mixing bowl combine of the sauce recipe and mix until sugar is fully dissolve.

4.Dip marinated lamb in sauce and place lamb on BBQ grill and allow to cook for 5-8 min or until lightly brown. Or place on oven proof baking sheet and cook for 15- 20 min and base heavily while cooking.

 

Remaining sauce may be poured in a sauce pan and cook slowly for 5 min and serve on the side with lamb.

 

 

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Blackened Salmon With Broccoli Rabe

 Blackened Salmon With Broccoli Rabe

After several consecutive weeks of too much celebrating, (just kidding) I’m trying to focus on eating healthful, clean meals. Tonight, I’m taking advantage of salmon left over from last night’s dinner and pulling together a light, Cajun-inspired dinner that’ll be ready in about twenty minutes.

Blackened fish is so easy that even my kitchen-averse spouse is able to make it. The key to the dish’s healthy flavor is not too much oil and lots of Cajun seasoning, a dynamic mix of seasonings such as salt, garlic, cayenne, chili powder, onion, and paprika. Fill up by pairing the sautéed Broccoli Rabe with some roasted potatoes.

 

Serves 4| Hands-On Time: 20 min| Total Time: 20 min

Blackened Salmon With Broccoli Rabe

 

Ingredients

4 6-ounce pieces skinless salmon fillet

2 tablespoons Cajun seasoning or blackening spice mix

1 bunch broccoli rabe (about 1 pound)

1 tablespoon olive oil

2 shallots, sliced

kosher salt

1/4 cup golden raisins

1 lemon, cut into wedges

 

 

Directions

Heat a large skillet over medium heat.

Coat both sides of the salmon with the seasoning and cook, covered, until opaque throughout and blackened, 3 to 4 minutes per side.

Meanwhile, in another skillet, bring the broccoli rabe and ½ cup water to a simmer.

Cook the broccoli rabe, covered, tossing occasionally, until tender, 3 to 4 minutes. Drain and transfer to a plate.

Wipe out the second skillet and heat the oil over medium heat. Add the shallots and ¼ teaspoon salt and cook until softened, about 3 minutes.

Mix in the raisins and broccoli rabe. Serve with the salmon and lemon.

 

Apple Brown Betty

Apple Brown Betty

apple betty

Ingredients

10 -12 baking apples, peeled, cored and sliced

Lemon juice (for tossing apples)

2 teaspoons cinnamon

¼ to ½ teaspoon nutmeg (to taste, optional)

1 1/4 cups flour

3/4 cup brown sugar

1/4 lb. butter

Syrup

2/3 cup brown sugar

1/4 cup hot water

juice of 1/2 lemon

Directions

Preheat your oven to 350 degrees.  Toss apples in lemon juice to coat.  Arrange apples on the bottom covering all of a 12” x 9” loaf pan.  Sprinkle each layer with cinnamon to taste.  Mix the flour, brown sugar and nutmeg (optional) and cut the butter in until crumbly.  Mix the syrup, and pour ½ over the apples.  Sprinkle the flour mixture over the apples, and pour the remaining syrup over the top.  Bake at 350 for 1 hour, makes 5 servings.  Serve with ice cream of your choice.  Enjoy!

BBq Chicken

Bbq Split Chicken

 

 

 

Ingredients

1 (4 to 6-pound) chicken

 

Marinade:

3 tablespoons olive oil

2 ounces honey

1 bunch freshly chopped cilantro leaves

1 quart buttermilk

 

Rub:

2 tablespoons onion powder

2 tablespoons garlic powder

2 tablespoons paprika

4 tablespoons ground cumin

Salt and freshly ground black pepper

4 cloves fresh minced garlic

 

Basting liquid:

1/2 cup olive oil

3 tablespoons ground cumin

3 tablespoons fennel seed

 

For the marinade:

Mix olive oil, honey and cilantro in a bowl, add buttermilk and mix well.

 

Directions

 

For the rub:

Mix ingredients in a small bowl and set aside until ready to use.

For the basting liquid:

Combine the ingredients in small bowl and place by the grill with a brush for basting.

Place chicken breast down. Grab tail and cut along the back bone, do the same on the other side and remove the back bone.

Add the marinade to a resealable bag and add the chicken.  Let marinate for 1 to 2 hours in the refrigerator.

Remove chicken from marinade and pat skin dry. Coat the skin of the chicken with the rub and carefully place some of the rub under skin. Return to the refrigerator for a minimum of 20 minutes.

Remove the chicken from the refrigerator and place the bone sides down. Tuck legs and wings to breast. Butcher string is great for this, just cross the legs and tie them so that only the joint of the thigh is touching the grill. Grill over direct flame or high heat for 10 to 15 minutes with the grill closed.

After 10 to 15 minutes turn the heat to medium-low or move chicken from direct heat and grill until cooked through, basting every 15 minutes.

When cooked through, Place the chicken, flesh side down, on the grill over high heat to get grill marks.

Serving Suggestion:

 

BBq Beef Brisket (whole)

The rub

Here is a classic bbq rub that I really enjoy:
1/3 cup paprika.
1/4 cup brown sugar.
3 tbs black pepper.
3 tbs salt.
1 tbs any specialty salt of your choice.
1 tbs cumin.
2 tsp celery seed.
2 tsp garlic powder.
2 tsp onion powder.
1 tsp cayenne pepper.

I apply a generous amount of the rub and make sure that the whole cut of meat is covered.

Beef Brisket

Let’s talk about the brisket itself and what to look for when shopping. Beef brisket comes from the chest area of the cow. It is typically a tough cut of meat that requires slow cooking for a tender outcome. A brisket can vary quite a bit in size depending on the size of the cow and how your local butcher is selling his cuts. Some butchers sell the whole brisket, while others will cut it into smaller parts. For the crowd that I usually cook for, I prefer a modest 6-8 pound brisket. There are countless varying opinions on what to look for when buying a brisket, so I will be sticking to what my experience has taught me, as well as what has obtained, for me, the best compliments on the meal. A whole brisket typically has two parts, called the point and the flat. The parts are fairly self-explanatory when you look at a whole brisket. The point is the much thicker, triangular-shaped end, which transitions into the thinner, more rectangular shaped end. Contrary to the opinions of many other chefs, I prefer working more with the flat. There is a lot more fat in the point, which gives plenty of flavor, but if the brisket is untrimmed, there is plenty of fat left on the flat part for great flavor. I have found cooking with the flat to be much more consistent, and the compliments that I have received have been a lot better when I use the flat. The points that I have worked with have a lot of fat throughout the whole cut, which makes for a mushy outcome that a lot of people end up spitting out! Trust me, it’s not fun to spend a good twelve hours or so preparing a meal, only to watch people spitting half of it out on their plate! Don’t get me wrong, I still got compliments on the flavor, but the texture left a little to be desired. I have found smaller, whole briskets that were fairly uniform in thickness, and they turn out great. I try to avoid the humongous briskets where the point is about twice the thickness of the flat. That is where I run into problems. Unless you’re cooking for a very large crowd, you will not need a brisket that big, anyway. Even if you have a large crowd to feed, I would recommend smoking several smaller briskets. They handle much easier and produce a better outcome.

Brisket Preparation

Let’s move on to preparation. This is probably the easiest part of the whole process. You want to start this early enough in the morning, so you have plenty of time for smoking the brisket before supper. I usually smoke a 6-7 pound brisket for about 10 hours. I’ll touch base a little more on this subject later on. I usually do not trim anything off of my brisket unless there are some discolored or dried edges. Go ahead and trim those off. I do not use any marinades prior to smoking a brisket. I use a dry rub and apply it just before I start my fire. Then, by the time I start my coals and let them ash over about halfway, the rub has had about 30 minutes or so to adhere to the brisket. It should look like this:

That’s it! Let it sit and go start your coals!

Charcoal Smoker

There are many different smokers, grills, and homemade cookers that you can use to smoke a brisket.

Now is the time to start your charcoal. Once your coals are about halfway through ashing over, and you have good heat coming off of them, go ahead and add some wood to the fire. There are currently six types of recommendable wood that I have used when smoking any type of meat. I have used apple, cherry, hickory, mesquite, sycamore and oak wood. I have had good results smoking with all six of these woods. Hickory, mesquite, and oak produce a nice flavor, but also produces the smokiest flavor of the these woods and you have to make sure to not overdo it when using these types. You can actually get an overbearing smoke flavor that overpowers the meat. I would recommend a fire of about 3/4 charcoal and 1/4 wood when using hickory, mesquite, or oak. My favorite so far is apple or pear wood. While these types are not as easily obtainable (I happen to have two of these trees in my yard that have lost branches – they found their way to my cooker!) it is my favorite to smoke with. Apple or cherry wood produces a mild, desireable smoke flavor. I love the flavor put into the meat when smoking with either of these woods. Typically, any tree that bears fruit will produce a desirable smoke flavor. I usually cut the wood into chunks about 6″ long by 3-4 ” wide.

Cooking the Brisket

Now comes the fun part! Make sure your grill is hot and clean, and go grab the brisket. No matter what type of cooker you are using, make sure that the brisket is not too close the fire. You want to smoke with indirect heat or else the brisket will cook too fast and it will not turn out right. For more ideas on where to place the brisket while cooking, check out BBQ Smoker.

When you place the brisket on the grill, make sure that the fat side is up. What this does is allows the fat cap to melt down through the meat, keeping it moist and adding great flavor. I let the brisket smoke like this for 4 to 5 hours to give it a nice, smoky flavor. Now go grab some heavy-duty aluminum foil or an aluminum pan big enough to hold the brisket. I douse the brisket with some Worcestershire sauce and then pour a couple of beers on it. Beer will add flavor and moisture. Alcohol tenderizes meat, so this will help the texture as well. Now make sure the brisket is covered well and let it cook for another 5 to 6 hours.

If you have kept your heat around 225-250 degrees this whole time, you should come out with a tender, great-tasting brisket that pulls apart with a fork. The brisket should be noticeably tender after cooking for about 8 hours. I would recommend checking it at this point. If it still seems pretty tough, you need to get your heat to around 300-325 degrees for the remaining two hours.

Oven Brisket

If you are cooking your brisket in an oven, make sure you have a pan with a lid on it and a rack to keep the meat from swilling around in the juices. Put your rub on the brisket, put it on the rack in the pan with the fat side up, and let it set for about 30 minutes to let the rub adhere to the meat. Next, pour a couple of beers on the brisket and cook it covered for about 8 hours or until desired tenderness at around 225-250 degrees. Add a bottle of Worcestershire sauce about halfway through cooking.

That’s it! You now know how to smoke a beef brisket! I hope you enjoy this brisket recipe. Serving Suggestion:

Not Your Every Day Smoked Pork Spare Ribs

Not Your Every Day Smoked Pork Spare Ribs

Not Your Every Day Smoked Pork Spare Ribs

 

 

Ingredients

6 whole racks of pork spareribs

Dry rub:

1/2 cup packed brown sugar

2 tablespoons chili powder

1 tablespoon paprika

1 tablespoon freshly ground black pepper

2 tablespoons garlic powder

2 teaspoons onion powder

2 teaspoons kosher salt

2 teaspoons ground cumin

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper or to taste (optional)

Mop Sauce:

1 cup apple cider

3/4 cup apple cider vinegar

1 tablespoon onion powder

1 tablespoon garlic powder

2 tablespoons lemon juice

1 jalapeno pepper, finely chopped (optional)

2 tablespoons hot pepper sauce

kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

2 cups wood chips, soaked (Sycamore has an absolutely phenomenal flavor)

Directions

In a medium bowl, mix together the brown sugar, chili powder, paprika, black pepper, 2 tablespoons garlic powder, 2 teaspoons onion powder, kosher salt, cumin, cinnamon, jalapeno seasoning, and cayenne pepper. Rub generously onto the pork spareribs. Cover, and refrigerate for at least 4 hours, or overnight.

Prepare an outdoor grill for indirect heat, or preheat a smoker to 250 degrees F (120 degrees C). While the grill heats up, prepare the mop sauce. In a medium bowl, stir together the apple cider, apple cider vinegar, 1 tablespoon onion powder, 1 tablespoon garlic powder, lemon juice, jalapeno, hot pepper sauce, salt and pepper.

When the coals are gray and ashed over place 2 handfuls of soaked woodchips directly on the coals. Place the ribs on the grill grate bone side down. Cover, and cook for 3 1/2 to 4 hours. Add more coals as needed. Baste with the mop sauce, and throw handfuls of soaked woodchips onto the coals every hour. Keep the temperature of the grill or smoker from going below 225 degrees F (110 degrees C). Ribs are done when the rub has created a wonderful crispy blackened ‘bark’, and the meat has pulled away from the bone. Discard any leftover mop sauce.

Serving Suggestion:

 

 

Genoa Style Minestrone Soup

Genoa Style Minestrone Soup

minestrone-soup

Cook Time 2 – 3 hours, Serves 6 – 8

Ingredients:

4 quarts water

1 pound ham

1 pound bony chicken parts

1/4 pound sliced prosciutto or bacon

2 cups diced potato

2 cups sliced celery

1 16 oz. can stewed tomatoes with juice (unseasoned)

4 small zucchini, sliced in 1/2 -inch pieces

1 1/2 cups sliced leeks

1 pound Italian (Romano) green beans or lima beans, or whatever you may have in your pantry kidney, black beans, navy beans . Canned is good.

1/2 cup salad

macaroni (ditalini,” Little thimbles” in Italian. A smaller cousin of elbow macaroni, ditalini is a straight smooth tubular shape.)

1 pound fresh peas, shelled

3 to 4 cups shredded white cabbage

2 teaspoons salt

1 teaspoon oregano

½ teaspoon basil

Pesto sauce

Directions:

Combine water, ham, chicken, and prosciutto, and bring to boiling.

Cover and simmer 2 hours.

Strain and reserve stock; discard bones.

Bring stock to boiling and add potatoes; cover and simmer 10 minutes.

Remove cover and add celery, zucchini, leeks, green beans, and macaroni and simmer 5 minutes.

Stir in peas and cabbage and cook 4 or 5 minutes more.

Salt and pepper to taste.

Beef Cabbage Carrot Soup

Beef Cabbage Carrot Soup

Total time:3 hrs. 30 mins

Prep time: 30 mins

Cook time: 3 hrs.

This is a delicious, hearty soup full of cabbage, carrots, ground or left over roast beef and onions. Tomato base and just the right amount of herbs and spices.   Beef provides flavor and protein for this delicious soup made with cabbage, vegetables, herbs, and wine. The soup is slow-simmered for 3 hours to tenderize the beef, so plan ahead. This is a restaurant favorite. Wonderful served with … warm crusty buttered bread.**

1 lb. beef cut in small cubes or 1 1/4 lb. course or chili ground beef 85-15 (1/2 inch or less drain off fat)

1 medium head cabbage (chopped)

1 sweet onion (sliced)

4 -6 carrots (sliced)

2 stalks celery (sliced)

1/2 cup good red wine

1 quart (4 cups) beef stock

1 cups chicken stock.(optional, contrasting flavors are always best)

1 (16 ounce) can red kidney beans, undrained (optional, I drain them, and use ½ can of the beans)

3 ounces tomato paste

Water as needed

1 (28 ounce) can tomatoes, chopped and liquid added to soup (I use stewed tomatoes, plain)

Worcestershire sauce to taste.

1/4 teaspoon black pepper

3/4 teaspoon onion powder

1/4 teaspoon garlic powder

Directions:

Chop onion, cabbage, carrots and celery. Sauté in 2 tbsp. olive oil. (Do not brown!) Just sauté till the vegetables are tender. Remove to Large Pot.

Use same pan as above and cook beef then drain off fat. Add to Pot.

Add remaining ingredients to the large pot and stir well.  This is a thin water based soup.

Bring to a boil, then reduce heat to a simmer. Simmer till all vegetables are very tender.  Taste to check and adjust seasoning.  Add as necessary. Serve with a crusty bread and butter. Enjoy!

**You can also add a few Brussels Sprouts to this dish. Cooked with the soup, they enhance the flavor tremendously.

Salt Substitutes

Salt Substitutes

Salt runs rampant through our diets these days due to an abundance of processed foods. I am a big fan of cooking with salt unless absolutely not necessary. That being said, I have used this mix for years and have never had any complaints.  Many people are suffering from high blood pressure and are trying to reduce their sodium intake.

I love salt.  I mean I really love salt to the point that if the food isn’t salted it isn’t worth eating.  Did I tell you I LOVE salt.
I am trying to season my food with herbs and spices to give it more flavor so I discovered these recipes for a homemade herbal salt substitute–no, lets call it a homemade flavor enhancer!

BUT,  There is more to seasoning food than adding salt. Sodium chloride or salt has an important function in our bodies, however many of us consume more than we need. The recommended daily value of sodium is about 2400 mg and for reference, one level teaspoon of salt has 2300 mg of sodium.  Sodium’s purpose in our bodies is to regulate fluids, muscle contraction, nerve impulses, and blood pressure. If you consume too much sodium, your body will retain too much fluid around your cells increasing blood pressure. High blood pressure is a contributing factor to heart attack and stroke.

no salt

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Flavorful Salt Substitute

1 tablespoon garlic powder
1 tablespoon powdered orange peel
1 tablespoon arrowroot powder
1 tablespoon sugar
2 tablespoons ground black pepper
2 tablespoons celery seed
2 tablespoons onion powder
4-½ teaspoons cream of tartar
1 ½ teaspoons citric acid powder
1 teaspoon ground dill weed
1 teaspoon white pepper
1 teaspoon dried thyme
½ teaspoon powdered lemon peel
½ teaspoon dried cayenne pepper

Place all ingredients in an electric blender, and grind them until they turn into fine powder. Store this flavorful salt substitute in a spice container with appropriate size holes, and keep it tightly sealed in a dark, cool location. With this tasty blend, those on a salt-free diet won’t miss regular table salt.

Spicy Salt Substitute

6 teaspoons onion powder
3 tablespoons paprika
3 tablespoons poultry seasoning
2 teaspoons ground oregano
2 teaspoons white pepper
2 tablespoons mustard powder
1 teaspoon chili powder
1 tablespoon garlic powder

Combine these ingredients in spice shaker, and store it in a cool dry location. Use it to enhance the flavor of foods in place of regular table salt.

Zesty Salt Substitute

3 tablespoons dried oregano
3 tablespoons garlic powder
1 ½ tablespoons paprika
1 ½ tablespoons mustard powder
2 teaspoons dried thyme
1 teaspoon onion powder
½ teaspoon ground dill

Place all ingredients in a blender, and grind them until they turn to fine powder. Place this zesty salt substitute in a spice shaker, and those who must eat salt-free foods can use it on their favorite fare to enhance the flavor without adding sodium to their diet.

 

Chile and Cocoa Rubbed Boneless Pork Chops

Chile and Cocoa Rubbed Boneless Pork Chops

Chile-and-Cocoa–Rubbed Boneless Pork Chops

Chef Bob rubs meat with a bit of sugar to help brown it but finishes the dish over low heat so the sugar does not char the outside. Here, he coats pork chops with cocoa and chile powders for a rub that is like a deconstructed version of Mexican mole’ sauce. YUM!

 

Ingredients

 

2 cold quarts water

1 1/2 teaspoons crushed red pepper

Kosher salt, fresh ground pepper to taste

4 1 1/2-inch-thick boneless pork loin chops

1 tablespoon unsweetened cocoa powder

1 tablespoon light brown sugar

1 tablespoon pure ancho chile powder

Extra-virgin olive oil, for brushing

Directions

 

1 In a large bowl, combine the (cold) water with the red pepper and 1 1/2 teaspoons of salt 1/2 teaspoon fresh ground pepper and stir until the salt dissolves. Add the pork chops and let brine at room temperature for 1 hour.

2 Light a grill and create a cool zone. (For a charcoal grill, rake the coals to one side; for a gas grill, leave one side unlit.) In a bowl, mix the cocoa, sugar and ancho powder with 1 tablespoon of salt.

3 Drain the pork chops and pat dry, removing any bits of crushed pepper. Brush generously with olive oil. Roll the pork chops in the cocoa rub and pat to help it adhere. Grill over moderately high heat for 4 minutes, turning the chops once or twice until lightly browned. Transfer the chops to the cool zone, cover and grill for about 15 minutes, until an instant-read thermometer inserted in the center of the chops registers 135 degrees for medium meat. Let the chops rest for 10 minutes before serving.

 

 

 

Barbecue Eye Round on Mashed Turnips and Potatoes with Roasted Brussels sprouts

Barbecue Eye Round on Mashed Turnips and Potatoes with Roasted Brussels sprouts

 The lean eye of round simmers in bottled barbecue sauce, giving it plenty of time to absorb the flavor. Potatoes and Brussels sprouts added to the beef make this a low-fat, yet satisfying, meal.  Perfectly seasoned, potato and turnips and roasted sprouts add nothing but taste and texture to this dish.  Tender, full layers of exotic flavor to guide your dining experience to new levels.  Accompanied by a side salad, a meal definitely worth making!

 

Ingredients

1 (3-lb.) eye round beef roast, fat trimmed

2 teaspoons ground cumin

2 tablespoons olive oil

2-1/2 pounds onions, cut into 1/3-inch-thick slices

2 celery ribs, chopped

2 garlic cloves, chopped

1 bottle (18 oz.) chipotle or regular barbecue sauce

2 pounds turnips, peeled, trimmed and cut into 1-inch cubes

3/4 pound Yukon Gold potatoes, peeled and cut into 1-1/2-inch cubes

1/4 cup milk

1 tablespoon horseradish sauce

1/4 cup chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

1-1/4 pounds Brussels Sprouts, trimmed and cut crosswise into 1/8-inch thick slices

 

 

Directions

1 Rinse beef and pat dry. Sprinkle with cumin. Heat 1 tablespoon oil in a heavy 6- to 8-quart pot over moderately high heat, until hot but not smoking. Add beef and brown, turning, until golden brown on all sides, about 6 minutes. Transfer to a plate.

2 Add onion and celery to same pot; cook over moderately high heat, stirring, until onion is golden brown, about 15 minutes. Add garlic and cook, stirring 1 minute. Transfer half of onion mixture to a bowl; reserve. Add half of barbecue sauce and 1 cup water to onion mixture in pot; stir, scraping up any browned bits on bottom of pot.

3 Return beef to pot; cover with reserved onion mixture and remaining barbecue sauce. Bring to a simmer and cover. Simmer, stirring occasionally, adding 1/2 cup water toward end of cooking time if sauce begins to stick to bottom of pot, until meat is very tender, about 3 hours.

4 Meanwhile, place turnips and potatoes in a 4-quart saucepan, cover with cold water by 2 inches and bring to a boil over moderately high heat; add salt. Simmer until very tender, about 20 minutes. Reserve 1/4 cup cooking liquid and drain vegetables in a colander. Return to pot with reserved cooking liquid and the milk. Mash with a handheld potato masher until smooth. Stir in horseradish sauce and parsley. Keep warm, covered.

5 While vegetables are cooking, preheat oven to 425 degree F and arrange rack in lower third. Toss together Brussels sprouts and remaining 1 tablespoon oil in a large shallow baking pan; season with pepper. Roast, stirring occasionally, until golden brown, about 15 minutes. Transfer to a serving bowl and keep warm, covered.

6 Remove beef from sauce and cut into thin slices. Spoon some onion mixture onto serving plates, top with a mound of mashed turnips and potatoes, then slices of beef and more onion mixture. Serve Brussels sprouts on the side. Makes 10 servings.

 

 

Crock Pot Yankee Pot Roast

crock pot roast

Crock pot pot roast

2 pounds boneless beef roast
1 teaspoon vegetable oil
salt and pepper to taste
1 onion, quartered
16 baby carrots
1 (10.75 ounce) can condensed cream of mushroom soup
4 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley

4 russet potatoes peeled, and quartered
.
Directions

1.In a large skillet over medium high heat, saute the roast in the oil for 15 minutes, or until all sides are well browned. Season with salt and pepper to taste and set aside. (optional, Not neccessary to do, or may be done at night and just added to the crock pot in the morning with all the other ingredients)
2.Place the onion, carrots, garlic, potaotes and parsley in the bottom of a six quart slow cooker. Place the roast on top of the vegetables and pour the soup over the roast and the vegetables.
3.Cover the slow cooker and cook on low setting for 8 to 10 hours.
4.Transfer roast to a serving platter and place the vegetables around it. Pour the roast gravy from the slow cooker into a gravy boat.

Chicken with Mozzarella Diabetic Friendly!

Chicken with Mozzarella Diabetic Friendly!

Smoked mozzarella and spinach are rolled into chicken breasts that are coated in bread crumbs for this main dish recipe, which is perfect for entertaining.  I’ve included the Nutritional facts for you to see how healthy this really is for everybody!

YIELD: 6 chicken rolls

 

chicken with mozz

 

Nutrition Facts per Serving:

CARB GRAMS PER SERVING: 6

Calories: 274

Protein(gm): 35

Carbohydrate(gm): 6

Fat, total(gm): 11

Cholesterol(mg): 77

Saturated fat(gm): 3

Dietary Fiber, total(gm): 1

Vitamin A(IU): 1895

Vitamin C(mg): 4

Sodium(mg): 368

Calcium(DV %): 182

Iron(DV %): 1

Diabetic Exchanges

Vegetables(d.e): 2

Very Lean Meat(d.e): 5

Fat(d.e): 1

6 skinless, boneless chicken breast halves (1 1/2 pounds)

Salt

Black pepper

1/4 cup finely chopped shallots or onions

1 clove garlic, minced

2 teaspoons olive oil

1/2 10 ounce package frozen chopped spinach, thawed and well drained

3 tablespoons pine nuts or walnuts, toasted

3/4 cup shredded smoked mozzarella cheese (3 ounces)

1/4 cup seasoned fine dry bread crumbs

1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese

1 tablespoon olive oil

1. Place 1 chicken breast half between 2 pieces of plastic wrap. Pound lightly with the flat side of a meat mallet into a rectangle about 1/8 inch thick. Remove plastic wrap. Season with salt and pepper. Repeat with all chicken breasts.

2. For filling, in a medium skillet cook shallots and garlic in the 2 teaspoons hot oil until tender. Remove from heat; stir in spinach, nuts, and smoked mozzarella. In a shallow bowl combine bread crumbs and Parmesan cheese.

3. Place 2 to 3 tablespoons of filling on each chicken breast. Fold in the bottom and sides; then roll up. Secure with wooden toothpicks.

4. Lightly brush each roll with the 1 tablespoon olive oil; coat with bread crumb mixture. Place rolls seam side down in a shallow baking pan. Bake, uncovered, in a 400 degrees F; oven about 25 minutes or until chicken is no longer pink (170 degrees F). Remove toothpicks before serving. Makes 6 chicken rolls.

Oxtail and Lentil Soup

Oxtail and Lentil Soup Recipe

Oxtail and Lentil Soup

Oxtails provide the flavor boost to this hearty soup of lentils, brown rice, and other vegetables. Serve with a salad for a filling meal.

Prep Time: 15 minutes

Cook Time: 2 hours, 30 minutes

Total Time: 2 hours, 45 minutes

Ingredients:

1/2 cup oil or shortening

2 pounds oxtails

2 cups chopped onion

1/2 cup chopped parsley

1/4 cup chopped bell pepper

1 cup raw brown rice

1 gallon ham stock or meat stock

2 Tablespoons Worcestershire sauce

1 Tablespoon minced garlic

1 large turnip, peeled and cut into 1/2-inch chunks

2 cups grated carrots

1 pound dry lentils, washed and picked over

2 medium-sized ripe tomatoes, peeled and seeded

Salt to taste

Louisiana hot sauce or ground cayenne pepper to taste

Preparation:

In a large, heavy pot over medium-high heat, heat the oil, and brown the oxtails. Then remove them and set aside.

In the same pot, saute the onions, parsley, and bell pepper until the onions are clear. Stir in the brown rice, then add the stock, Worcestershire, garlic, turnip, carrots, and lentils. Bring to a boil, then add the oxtails. Squeeze the tomatoes into the pot, add the salt and hot sauce, and stir. Reduce the heat to low, cover, and let simmer for at least 2 hours, stirring occasionally.

The soup is ready to serve when the rice and lentils are tender.

10 servings

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