Category Archives: Bar-B-Que

Perfect bone-in Prime Rib of Beef with the Mysterious “Method X”

Perfect bone-in Prime Rib of Beef with the Mysterious “Method X”

prime rib   prime rib 2

Perfect prime rib is an easy undertaking if you follow a few key steps. The most important is using an accurate digital thermometer. This is the only way to ensure the desired doneness, which hopefully is a perfectly pink medium-rare, when the flavor and texture are at their best.

This prime rib recipe will work no matter what size roast you’re using. A great rule of thumb is each rib will feed 2 guests. So, a 4 rib roast will serve 8 guests. Cooking time varies with the rib size, you need to verify your oven comes to 500 degrees! Repeat, your roast must be at room temperature for this to work!
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 2 Hours plus initial roasting time.

Ingredients:
1 standing beef rib roast (4 to 7 ribs, 9 to 18 pounds)
fresh course-ground black pepper, as needed
kosher salt (or other larger grain, flake-style salt), 1/2 teaspoon per bone
softened butter, 1/2 tbsp per rib of beef
large metal roasting pan with at least 3-inch sides.
1 quart cold beef broth
This method is said to work for any size prime rib. The meat is brought to room temperature (this is critical), and seasoned anyway you like. Then you multiply the exact weight times 5 minutes. For me it was 3.75 x 5 = 18.75 minutes. The roast is cooked at 500 degrees F. for exactly that many minutes. The heat is turned off, and you wait 2 hours without opening the oven door.

Once you remove the prime rib, you’ll be slicing into the juiciest, tenderest, most perfectly medium-rare meat you’ve ever seen.

Preparation:
1. Remove the prime rib from the refrigerator and place in the pan. No rack is needed as the rib bones form a natural rack, and will keep the prime rib off the pan. Rub the entire surface of the cold roast with butter, and coat evenly with the kosher salt and black pepper.
2. Leave the prime rib out at room temperature for 2 hours. Preheat the oven to 450 degrees F. When the oven is hot, put the roast in and cook for 20 minutes to sear the outside of the roast. After 20 minutes turn the oven down to 325 degrees F. and roast until the desired internal temperature is reached (see guide below). For medium-rare this will take approximately 15 minutes per pound.
3. Transfer to a large platter, and let the prime rib rest, loosely covered with foil for 30 minutes before serving. Cutting into the meat too early will cause a significant loss of juice.
To Make the “Au Jus” Sauce
While the prime rib is resting, pour off all but 2 tablespoons of the fat from the pan and place on the stove-top over medium heat. Pour in the beef broth and whisk into the drippings, scraping all the caramelized beef drippings from the bottom of the pan.
Turn heat to high and cook the sauce for 10 minutes until it reduces slightly. (this is not a gravy, so don’t expect a thick, heavy sauce). Adjust seasoning, strain and serve along side the prime rib. Serve with mashed potatoes (flavored or not) and asparagus or sautéed broccoli raub.
Internal Temperature Guide
Below are the internal temperatures to go by, depending on how done you like your prime rib. Remember, these are the temperatures to remove the beef, and not the final temperature. The roast will continue to cook after it’s removed.
Rare: remove at 110 degrees F. (final temp about 120)
Medium-Rare: remove at 120 degrees F. (final temp about 130)
Medium: remove at 130 degrees F. (final temp about 140)

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Ajeen Jerk BBQ Lamb Ribs

Ajeen Jerk BBQ Lamb Ribs

Ajeen Jerk BBQ Lamb Ribs    Smoked and BBQed Lamb Ribs  lamb ribs (230x230)

Prep Time: 15 mins  Total Time: 1 hour 15 mins  Serves: 10, Yield: 8 pieces

About This Recipe

“The finest ingredients of the Caribbean prepared beautifully and complement the perfect lamb”

Ingredients

5 lbs. lamb ribs

Lamb Marinade

1 tablespoon red chili pepper flakes

3 garlic cloves

1 ounce grated ginger

2 ounces chopped onions

2 tablespoons olive oil

1 ounce spring fresh basil

1/4 teaspoon salt & pepper, to taste

1 ounce spring thyme Sauce

3 ounces chopped onions

3 cloves garlic cloves

1/2 cup tomato ketchup

2 tablespoons vegetable oil

8 ounces hot sauce ( sambol oelek)

8 ounces brown sugar

2 ounces lemon juice

2 tablespoons honey

1 tablespoon soya sauce

1/4 cup pineapple juice

1 tablespoon Jamaican jerk spice

Directions

1.Wash and season lamb with salt and pepper, combine marinade seasoning and marinate lamb for an hour or more.

2.In a thick pot bring lamb to a boil with marinate and water. Add more salt and pepper if necessary to water. Allow lamb rib to cook for 45 min or until tender.

Directions

3.In a mixing bowl combine of the sauce recipe and mix until sugar is fully dissolve.

4.Dip marinated lamb in sauce and place lamb on BBQ grill and allow to cook for 5-8 min or until lightly brown. Or place on oven proof baking sheet and cook for 15- 20 min and base heavily while cooking.

 

Remaining sauce may be poured in a sauce pan and cook slowly for 5 min and serve on the side with lamb.

 

 

Southern Red Beans and Rice

Southern Red Beans and Rice

red beans and rice

Prep time: 10 min Cook time: 2 hours Yield: About 4 to 6 servings

Ingredients

1 pound of dried red kidney beans

1/2 pound of bacon, chopped

1 large onion, chopped

1 green bell pepper, chopped

1 large stalk of celery, chopped

2 cloves of garlic, minced

Freshly cracked black pepper, to taste

1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper, or to taste, optional

1 teaspoon dried basil

2 bay leaves

1/2 tablespoon of canola oil

1 package (14 oz.) smoked sausage or Andouille sausage(very spicy), ham bone, ham hocks, hamchunks, or any combination

2 quarts of water

1/4 cup (1/2 stick) butter, optional

Kosher salt to taste, if needed – BUT ONLY AT THE END!

Hot, cooked rice

Sliced green onion, for garnish, optional

Hot sauce, for the table

Instructions:

Rinse and sort beans and place into a deep pot, adding water to cover beans plus about an inch or so. Discard any malformed or floating beans. 

Do not add any seasonings or salt! Bring to a boil; boil for 5 minutes uncovered, turn off heat, cover and let soak for one hour. Drain and set aside in a large pot.In a separate skillet, cook the bacon until lightly cooked and still limp. Add the onion, bell pepper, and celery to the bacon and sauté the veggies until tender. Add the garlic, black and red pepper, basil and bay leaf into the vegetable mixture and let seasoning meld with the veggies for about 3 minutes, stirring. Add the bacon, veggie & seasoning mixture to the pot of beans. Meanwhile slice sausage in half lengthwise and cut into 1/4-inch chunks. Add oil to skillet you used for the veggies and lightly brown the sausage. Transfer to the bean pot. If you have any leftover ham chunks, cut those up too, brown them and add them in.

Add 2 quarts of fresh water and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to a simmer and cooked uncovered for 1-1/2 to 2 hours, or until beans are tender and slightly thickened. When beans are just about done, slide in a half stick of butter. The butter adds richness to the beans and makes them just super delish, but is totally optional if you want to leave it out. They are good without it. If you need to thicken them up more, just remove about a cup of the beans and mash them with a fork, returning them to the pot. Serve over hot, cooked rice and garnish with sliced green onion, if desired. Pass hot sauce at the table.

~Cook’s Notes~

Note: Do not add any salt until the end, and then only if it needs it. There is some salt present from all the meats involved, so taste and adjust your seasonings toward the end of cooking, adding salt here if needed. I very often find that the pot needs no additional salt at all. Taste, add salt if needed, taste again and adjust seasoning as needed.

Serving  Suggestion:

 

 Southern Red Beans and Rice and cornbread

BBq Chicken

Bbq Split Chicken

 

 

 

Ingredients

1 (4 to 6-pound) chicken

 

Marinade:

3 tablespoons olive oil

2 ounces honey

1 bunch freshly chopped cilantro leaves

1 quart buttermilk

 

Rub:

2 tablespoons onion powder

2 tablespoons garlic powder

2 tablespoons paprika

4 tablespoons ground cumin

Salt and freshly ground black pepper

4 cloves fresh minced garlic

 

Basting liquid:

1/2 cup olive oil

3 tablespoons ground cumin

3 tablespoons fennel seed

 

For the marinade:

Mix olive oil, honey and cilantro in a bowl, add buttermilk and mix well.

 

Directions

 

For the rub:

Mix ingredients in a small bowl and set aside until ready to use.

For the basting liquid:

Combine the ingredients in small bowl and place by the grill with a brush for basting.

Place chicken breast down. Grab tail and cut along the back bone, do the same on the other side and remove the back bone.

Add the marinade to a resealable bag and add the chicken.  Let marinate for 1 to 2 hours in the refrigerator.

Remove chicken from marinade and pat skin dry. Coat the skin of the chicken with the rub and carefully place some of the rub under skin. Return to the refrigerator for a minimum of 20 minutes.

Remove the chicken from the refrigerator and place the bone sides down. Tuck legs and wings to breast. Butcher string is great for this, just cross the legs and tie them so that only the joint of the thigh is touching the grill. Grill over direct flame or high heat for 10 to 15 minutes with the grill closed.

After 10 to 15 minutes turn the heat to medium-low or move chicken from direct heat and grill until cooked through, basting every 15 minutes.

When cooked through, Place the chicken, flesh side down, on the grill over high heat to get grill marks.

Serving Suggestion:

 

BBq Beef Brisket (whole)

The rub

Here is a classic bbq rub that I really enjoy:
1/3 cup paprika.
1/4 cup brown sugar.
3 tbs black pepper.
3 tbs salt.
1 tbs any specialty salt of your choice.
1 tbs cumin.
2 tsp celery seed.
2 tsp garlic powder.
2 tsp onion powder.
1 tsp cayenne pepper.

I apply a generous amount of the rub and make sure that the whole cut of meat is covered.

Beef Brisket

Let’s talk about the brisket itself and what to look for when shopping. Beef brisket comes from the chest area of the cow. It is typically a tough cut of meat that requires slow cooking for a tender outcome. A brisket can vary quite a bit in size depending on the size of the cow and how your local butcher is selling his cuts. Some butchers sell the whole brisket, while others will cut it into smaller parts. For the crowd that I usually cook for, I prefer a modest 6-8 pound brisket. There are countless varying opinions on what to look for when buying a brisket, so I will be sticking to what my experience has taught me, as well as what has obtained, for me, the best compliments on the meal. A whole brisket typically has two parts, called the point and the flat. The parts are fairly self-explanatory when you look at a whole brisket. The point is the much thicker, triangular-shaped end, which transitions into the thinner, more rectangular shaped end. Contrary to the opinions of many other chefs, I prefer working more with the flat. There is a lot more fat in the point, which gives plenty of flavor, but if the brisket is untrimmed, there is plenty of fat left on the flat part for great flavor. I have found cooking with the flat to be much more consistent, and the compliments that I have received have been a lot better when I use the flat. The points that I have worked with have a lot of fat throughout the whole cut, which makes for a mushy outcome that a lot of people end up spitting out! Trust me, it’s not fun to spend a good twelve hours or so preparing a meal, only to watch people spitting half of it out on their plate! Don’t get me wrong, I still got compliments on the flavor, but the texture left a little to be desired. I have found smaller, whole briskets that were fairly uniform in thickness, and they turn out great. I try to avoid the humongous briskets where the point is about twice the thickness of the flat. That is where I run into problems. Unless you’re cooking for a very large crowd, you will not need a brisket that big, anyway. Even if you have a large crowd to feed, I would recommend smoking several smaller briskets. They handle much easier and produce a better outcome.

Brisket Preparation

Let’s move on to preparation. This is probably the easiest part of the whole process. You want to start this early enough in the morning, so you have plenty of time for smoking the brisket before supper. I usually smoke a 6-7 pound brisket for about 10 hours. I’ll touch base a little more on this subject later on. I usually do not trim anything off of my brisket unless there are some discolored or dried edges. Go ahead and trim those off. I do not use any marinades prior to smoking a brisket. I use a dry rub and apply it just before I start my fire. Then, by the time I start my coals and let them ash over about halfway, the rub has had about 30 minutes or so to adhere to the brisket. It should look like this:

That’s it! Let it sit and go start your coals!

Charcoal Smoker

There are many different smokers, grills, and homemade cookers that you can use to smoke a brisket.

Now is the time to start your charcoal. Once your coals are about halfway through ashing over, and you have good heat coming off of them, go ahead and add some wood to the fire. There are currently six types of recommendable wood that I have used when smoking any type of meat. I have used apple, cherry, hickory, mesquite, sycamore and oak wood. I have had good results smoking with all six of these woods. Hickory, mesquite, and oak produce a nice flavor, but also produces the smokiest flavor of the these woods and you have to make sure to not overdo it when using these types. You can actually get an overbearing smoke flavor that overpowers the meat. I would recommend a fire of about 3/4 charcoal and 1/4 wood when using hickory, mesquite, or oak. My favorite so far is apple or pear wood. While these types are not as easily obtainable (I happen to have two of these trees in my yard that have lost branches – they found their way to my cooker!) it is my favorite to smoke with. Apple or cherry wood produces a mild, desireable smoke flavor. I love the flavor put into the meat when smoking with either of these woods. Typically, any tree that bears fruit will produce a desirable smoke flavor. I usually cut the wood into chunks about 6″ long by 3-4 ” wide.

Cooking the Brisket

Now comes the fun part! Make sure your grill is hot and clean, and go grab the brisket. No matter what type of cooker you are using, make sure that the brisket is not too close the fire. You want to smoke with indirect heat or else the brisket will cook too fast and it will not turn out right. For more ideas on where to place the brisket while cooking, check out BBQ Smoker.

When you place the brisket on the grill, make sure that the fat side is up. What this does is allows the fat cap to melt down through the meat, keeping it moist and adding great flavor. I let the brisket smoke like this for 4 to 5 hours to give it a nice, smoky flavor. Now go grab some heavy-duty aluminum foil or an aluminum pan big enough to hold the brisket. I douse the brisket with some Worcestershire sauce and then pour a couple of beers on it. Beer will add flavor and moisture. Alcohol tenderizes meat, so this will help the texture as well. Now make sure the brisket is covered well and let it cook for another 5 to 6 hours.

If you have kept your heat around 225-250 degrees this whole time, you should come out with a tender, great-tasting brisket that pulls apart with a fork. The brisket should be noticeably tender after cooking for about 8 hours. I would recommend checking it at this point. If it still seems pretty tough, you need to get your heat to around 300-325 degrees for the remaining two hours.

Oven Brisket

If you are cooking your brisket in an oven, make sure you have a pan with a lid on it and a rack to keep the meat from swilling around in the juices. Put your rub on the brisket, put it on the rack in the pan with the fat side up, and let it set for about 30 minutes to let the rub adhere to the meat. Next, pour a couple of beers on the brisket and cook it covered for about 8 hours or until desired tenderness at around 225-250 degrees. Add a bottle of Worcestershire sauce about halfway through cooking.

That’s it! You now know how to smoke a beef brisket! I hope you enjoy this brisket recipe. Serving Suggestion:

Not Your Every Day Smoked Pork Spare Ribs

Not Your Every Day Smoked Pork Spare Ribs

Not Your Every Day Smoked Pork Spare Ribs

 

 

Ingredients

6 whole racks of pork spareribs

Dry rub:

1/2 cup packed brown sugar

2 tablespoons chili powder

1 tablespoon paprika

1 tablespoon freshly ground black pepper

2 tablespoons garlic powder

2 teaspoons onion powder

2 teaspoons kosher salt

2 teaspoons ground cumin

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper or to taste (optional)

Mop Sauce:

1 cup apple cider

3/4 cup apple cider vinegar

1 tablespoon onion powder

1 tablespoon garlic powder

2 tablespoons lemon juice

1 jalapeno pepper, finely chopped (optional)

2 tablespoons hot pepper sauce

kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

2 cups wood chips, soaked (Sycamore has an absolutely phenomenal flavor)

Directions

In a medium bowl, mix together the brown sugar, chili powder, paprika, black pepper, 2 tablespoons garlic powder, 2 teaspoons onion powder, kosher salt, cumin, cinnamon, jalapeno seasoning, and cayenne pepper. Rub generously onto the pork spareribs. Cover, and refrigerate for at least 4 hours, or overnight.

Prepare an outdoor grill for indirect heat, or preheat a smoker to 250 degrees F (120 degrees C). While the grill heats up, prepare the mop sauce. In a medium bowl, stir together the apple cider, apple cider vinegar, 1 tablespoon onion powder, 1 tablespoon garlic powder, lemon juice, jalapeno, hot pepper sauce, salt and pepper.

When the coals are gray and ashed over place 2 handfuls of soaked woodchips directly on the coals. Place the ribs on the grill grate bone side down. Cover, and cook for 3 1/2 to 4 hours. Add more coals as needed. Baste with the mop sauce, and throw handfuls of soaked woodchips onto the coals every hour. Keep the temperature of the grill or smoker from going below 225 degrees F (110 degrees C). Ribs are done when the rub has created a wonderful crispy blackened ‘bark’, and the meat has pulled away from the bone. Discard any leftover mop sauce.

Serving Suggestion:

 

 

Genoa Style Minestrone Soup

Genoa Style Minestrone Soup

minestrone-soup

Cook Time 2 – 3 hours, Serves 6 – 8

Ingredients:

4 quarts water

1 pound ham

1 pound bony chicken parts

1/4 pound sliced prosciutto or bacon

2 cups diced potato

2 cups sliced celery

1 16 oz. can stewed tomatoes with juice (unseasoned)

4 small zucchini, sliced in 1/2 -inch pieces

1 1/2 cups sliced leeks

1 pound Italian (Romano) green beans or lima beans, or whatever you may have in your pantry kidney, black beans, navy beans . Canned is good.

1/2 cup salad

macaroni (ditalini,” Little thimbles” in Italian. A smaller cousin of elbow macaroni, ditalini is a straight smooth tubular shape.)

1 pound fresh peas, shelled

3 to 4 cups shredded white cabbage

2 teaspoons salt

1 teaspoon oregano

½ teaspoon basil

Pesto sauce

Directions:

Combine water, ham, chicken, and prosciutto, and bring to boiling.

Cover and simmer 2 hours.

Strain and reserve stock; discard bones.

Bring stock to boiling and add potatoes; cover and simmer 10 minutes.

Remove cover and add celery, zucchini, leeks, green beans, and macaroni and simmer 5 minutes.

Stir in peas and cabbage and cook 4 or 5 minutes more.

Salt and pepper to taste.

Braised Chicken Legs with White Wine, Bacon, Sweet Onions & Mushrooms

Braised Chicken Legs with White Wine, Bacon, Sweet Onions & Mushrooms

Braised Chicken Legs

A large, straight-sided-ovenproof sauté pan with a lid is ideal for making this chicken braise.

 

Ingredients

8 small sweet onions

4 bone-in, skin-on medium chicken thighs (1-1/2 to 1-3/4 pounds)

4 chicken drumsticks (1-1/4 to 1-1/2 pounds)

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

2 tablespoons vegetable oil

8 medium cremini mushrooms, trimmed and halved

3 ounces bacon (3 strips), cut crosswise into 1/4-inch strips

1 medium carrot, peeled and sliced in 1/4-inch rounds

1 cup dry white wine

3 large thyme sprigs

1 cup homemade or low-salt canned chicken broth

2 teaspoons fresh thyme leaves

Directions

Position a rack in the center of the oven and heat the oven to 350 degrees F.

Bring a 2-quart saucepan of water to a boil. Drop in the onions and blanch them for 1 minute. Drain in a colander, and then shower with cold water to stop the cooking. Peel the onions, leaving enough of the root end intact that they will remain whole while cooking.

Season the chicken pieces generously with salt and pepper. In a straight-sided 10- or 11-inch ovenproof sauté pan with a lid, heat the oil over medium-high heat until very hot. Arrange the chicken pieces skin side down in the pan (it will be crowded), cover with a splatter screen, if you have one, and cook until deeply browned, about 5 minutes. Turn the pieces over and cook until the other sides are browned. 3 to 5 minutes more.

Transfer to a plate. Pour out and discard all the fat from the pan.

Put the pan over medium heat. Add the peeled onions, mushrooms, bacon, and carrot to the pan and cook until the bacon is crisp and the vegetables are browned, 8 to 10 minutes. Add the wine and thyme sprigs and bring to a boil, scraping the browned bits from the bottom of the pan with a wooden spoon. Boil until the wine has reduced to 1/2 cup, about 5 minutes. Add the chicken broth and bring to a boil.

Return the chicken pieces to the pan, along with any accumulated juices, and cover. Transfer to the oven and braise until the chicken is fork-tender and the drumstick meat starts to come away from the bone, 45 to 50 minutes.

With a slotted spoon, transfer the chicken, onions, bacon, carrots, and mushrooms to a serving dish and keep warm by covering the dish loosely with foil. Discard the thyme sprigs. Tilt the sauté pan and skim off as much fat as possible from the sauce. Bring the sauce to a boil over medium high heat, reduce the heat to medium low, and simmer until the sauce is slightly thickened, skimming off any skin that forms on top, about 5 minutes. Season to taste with pepper (the sauce will be nicely salted at this point, if not adjust to your own taste). Pour the sauce over the chicken, sprinkle with the thyme leaves, and serve.

 

SERVING SUGGESTIONS:

Serve with mashed potatoes.

 

DRINK SUGGESTIONS:

Pair this braise with a crisp, semi sweet white wine from northern Italy, such as the Gini Soave Classico.

 

 

Beef Cabbage Carrot Soup

Beef Cabbage Carrot Soup

Total time:3 hrs. 30 mins

Prep time: 30 mins

Cook time: 3 hrs.

This is a delicious, hearty soup full of cabbage, carrots, ground or left over roast beef and onions. Tomato base and just the right amount of herbs and spices.   Beef provides flavor and protein for this delicious soup made with cabbage, vegetables, herbs, and wine. The soup is slow-simmered for 3 hours to tenderize the beef, so plan ahead. This is a restaurant favorite. Wonderful served with … warm crusty buttered bread.**

1 lb. beef cut in small cubes or 1 1/4 lb. course or chili ground beef 85-15 (1/2 inch or less drain off fat)

1 medium head cabbage (chopped)

1 sweet onion (sliced)

4 -6 carrots (sliced)

2 stalks celery (sliced)

1/2 cup good red wine

1 quart (4 cups) beef stock

1 cups chicken stock.(optional, contrasting flavors are always best)

1 (16 ounce) can red kidney beans, undrained (optional, I drain them, and use ½ can of the beans)

3 ounces tomato paste

Water as needed

1 (28 ounce) can tomatoes, chopped and liquid added to soup (I use stewed tomatoes, plain)

Worcestershire sauce to taste.

1/4 teaspoon black pepper

3/4 teaspoon onion powder

1/4 teaspoon garlic powder

Directions:

Chop onion, cabbage, carrots and celery. Sauté in 2 tbsp. olive oil. (Do not brown!) Just sauté till the vegetables are tender. Remove to Large Pot.

Use same pan as above and cook beef then drain off fat. Add to Pot.

Add remaining ingredients to the large pot and stir well.  This is a thin water based soup.

Bring to a boil, then reduce heat to a simmer. Simmer till all vegetables are very tender.  Taste to check and adjust seasoning.  Add as necessary. Serve with a crusty bread and butter. Enjoy!

**You can also add a few Brussels Sprouts to this dish. Cooked with the soup, they enhance the flavor tremendously.

Chile and Cocoa Rubbed Boneless Pork Chops

Chile and Cocoa Rubbed Boneless Pork Chops

Chile-and-Cocoa–Rubbed Boneless Pork Chops

Chef Bob rubs meat with a bit of sugar to help brown it but finishes the dish over low heat so the sugar does not char the outside. Here, he coats pork chops with cocoa and chile powders for a rub that is like a deconstructed version of Mexican mole’ sauce. YUM!

 

Ingredients

 

2 cold quarts water

1 1/2 teaspoons crushed red pepper

Kosher salt, fresh ground pepper to taste

4 1 1/2-inch-thick boneless pork loin chops

1 tablespoon unsweetened cocoa powder

1 tablespoon light brown sugar

1 tablespoon pure ancho chile powder

Extra-virgin olive oil, for brushing

Directions

 

1 In a large bowl, combine the (cold) water with the red pepper and 1 1/2 teaspoons of salt 1/2 teaspoon fresh ground pepper and stir until the salt dissolves. Add the pork chops and let brine at room temperature for 1 hour.

2 Light a grill and create a cool zone. (For a charcoal grill, rake the coals to one side; for a gas grill, leave one side unlit.) In a bowl, mix the cocoa, sugar and ancho powder with 1 tablespoon of salt.

3 Drain the pork chops and pat dry, removing any bits of crushed pepper. Brush generously with olive oil. Roll the pork chops in the cocoa rub and pat to help it adhere. Grill over moderately high heat for 4 minutes, turning the chops once or twice until lightly browned. Transfer the chops to the cool zone, cover and grill for about 15 minutes, until an instant-read thermometer inserted in the center of the chops registers 135 degrees for medium meat. Let the chops rest for 10 minutes before serving.

 

 

 

Not Your Every Day Smoked Pork Spare Ribs

Not Your Every Day Smoked Pork Spare Ribs

Not Your Every Day Smoked Pork Spare Ribs

Pork Ribs have a long tradition in the old style world of barbecue, ranking with brisket and pulled pork in the competitions as a true art form.  They are marinated in a dry rub, then smoked low and slow, the sauce is added near the end and sizzled on. Just like the champion pitmasters and the best ribjoints do it.

Ribs are the holy grail. Mastering them marks the difference between the tyro, pyro, and pitmaster.  We’re talking Southern ribs here, a style created by early African Americans and as uniquely American as their other great contributions to our culture: Jazz the Blues, Cajun and Creole Soulfood.

A complex spice rub, elegant hardwood smoke, tangy sweet sauce, all underpinned and held together by the distinct flavor of pork. They are juicy and tender and they tug cleanly off the bone but don’t fall off the bone. Their scent clings to your fingers for hours

 

 

Ingredients

6 whole racks of St. Louis cut pork spareribs

Dry rub:

1/2 cup packed brown sugar

2 tablespoons chili powder

1 tablespoon paprika

1 tablespoon freshly ground black pepper

2 tablespoons garlic powder

2 teaspoons onion powder

2 teaspoons kosher salt

2 teaspoons ground cumin

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper or to taste (optional)

Mop Sauce:

1 cup apple cider

3/4 cup apple cider vinegar

1 tablespoon onion powder

1 tablespoon garlic powder

2 tablespoons lemon juice

1 jalapeno pepper, finely chopped (optional)

2 tablespoons hot pepper sauce

kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

2 cups wood chips, soaked (Sycamore has an absolutely phenomenal flavor)

Directions

In a medium bowl, mix together the brown sugar, chili powder, paprika, black pepper, 2 tablespoons garlic powder, 2 teaspoons onion powder, kosher salt, cumin, cinnamon, jalapeno seasoning, and cayenne pepper. Rub generously onto the pork spareribs. Cover, and refrigerate for at least 4 hours, or overnight.

Prepare an outdoor grill for indirect heat, or preheat a smoker to 250 degrees F (120 degrees C). While the grill heats up, prepare the mop sauce. In a medium bowl, stir together the apple cider, apple cider vinegar, 1 tablespoon onion powder, 1 tablespoon garlic powder, lemon juice, jalapeno, hot pepper sauce, salt and pepper.

When the coals are gray and ashed over place 2 handfuls of soaked woodchips directly on the coals. Place the ribs on the grill grate bone side down. Cover, and cook for 3 1/2 to 4 hours. Add more coals as needed. Baste with the mop sauce, and throw handfuls of soaked woodchips onto the coals every hour. Keep the temperature of the grill or smoker from going below 225 degrees F (110 degrees C). Ribs are done when the rub has created a wonderful crispy blackened ‘bark’, and the meat has pulled away from the bone. Discard any leftover mop sauce.  Total smoking/cooking time 5 to 7 hours, depending on the number of slabs you have.

Serving Suggestion :

  or this  or even this! 

Barbecue Eye Round on Mashed Turnips and Potatoes with Roasted Brussels sprouts

Barbecue Eye Round on Mashed Turnips and Potatoes with Roasted Brussels sprouts

 The lean eye of round simmers in bottled barbecue sauce, giving it plenty of time to absorb the flavor. Potatoes and Brussels sprouts added to the beef make this a low-fat, yet satisfying, meal.  Perfectly seasoned, potato and turnips and roasted sprouts add nothing but taste and texture to this dish.  Tender, full layers of exotic flavor to guide your dining experience to new levels.  Accompanied by a side salad, a meal definitely worth making!

 

Ingredients

1 (3-lb.) eye round beef roast, fat trimmed

2 teaspoons ground cumin

2 tablespoons olive oil

2-1/2 pounds onions, cut into 1/3-inch-thick slices

2 celery ribs, chopped

2 garlic cloves, chopped

1 bottle (18 oz.) chipotle or regular barbecue sauce

2 pounds turnips, peeled, trimmed and cut into 1-inch cubes

3/4 pound Yukon Gold potatoes, peeled and cut into 1-1/2-inch cubes

1/4 cup milk

1 tablespoon horseradish sauce

1/4 cup chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

1-1/4 pounds Brussels Sprouts, trimmed and cut crosswise into 1/8-inch thick slices

 

 

Directions

1 Rinse beef and pat dry. Sprinkle with cumin. Heat 1 tablespoon oil in a heavy 6- to 8-quart pot over moderately high heat, until hot but not smoking. Add beef and brown, turning, until golden brown on all sides, about 6 minutes. Transfer to a plate.

2 Add onion and celery to same pot; cook over moderately high heat, stirring, until onion is golden brown, about 15 minutes. Add garlic and cook, stirring 1 minute. Transfer half of onion mixture to a bowl; reserve. Add half of barbecue sauce and 1 cup water to onion mixture in pot; stir, scraping up any browned bits on bottom of pot.

3 Return beef to pot; cover with reserved onion mixture and remaining barbecue sauce. Bring to a simmer and cover. Simmer, stirring occasionally, adding 1/2 cup water toward end of cooking time if sauce begins to stick to bottom of pot, until meat is very tender, about 3 hours.

4 Meanwhile, place turnips and potatoes in a 4-quart saucepan, cover with cold water by 2 inches and bring to a boil over moderately high heat; add salt. Simmer until very tender, about 20 minutes. Reserve 1/4 cup cooking liquid and drain vegetables in a colander. Return to pot with reserved cooking liquid and the milk. Mash with a handheld potato masher until smooth. Stir in horseradish sauce and parsley. Keep warm, covered.

5 While vegetables are cooking, preheat oven to 425 degree F and arrange rack in lower third. Toss together Brussels sprouts and remaining 1 tablespoon oil in a large shallow baking pan; season with pepper. Roast, stirring occasionally, until golden brown, about 15 minutes. Transfer to a serving bowl and keep warm, covered.

6 Remove beef from sauce and cut into thin slices. Spoon some onion mixture onto serving plates, top with a mound of mashed turnips and potatoes, then slices of beef and more onion mixture. Serve Brussels sprouts on the side. Makes 10 servings.

 

 

City Chicken

City Chicken

city chicken

City chicken is an entrée consisting of cubes of meat (usually pork), which have been placed on a wooden skewer (approximately 4-5 inches long), then fried and/or baked. Depending on the recipe, they may be breaded.  The dish is popular in cities throughout the eastern Great Lakes region of Ohio and Michigan as well as the northeastern Appalachian regions of Pennsylvania and Upstate New York, and at least as far south and west as Louisville, Kentucky. City chicken is commonly found in the metropolitan areas of Binghamton, Cincinnati, Cleveland, Detroit, Erie, Pittsburgh and Scranton, hence, the dish’s ‘urban’ title.

Pork is the base meat in the common versions of the dish, although recipes vary regionally. For example, Pittsburgh-area preparations are almost always breaded and usually baked, while in Binghamton, the meat is usually marinated, battered and then deep fried.  The Cleveland version is generally baked without breading, but the meat is dredged in flour, browned in a pan, then finished in the oven, and served with gravy.  My personal favorite is the way my Mom would make it, alternating beef and pork cubes on the skewers.   Grocery stores in both in the Greater Cleveland area as well as those in the Pittsburgh metro area include wooden skewers with pork cubes specifically packaged as city chicken. In Ottawa, Canada, at least one variation involves skewers of three kinds of meat: pork, veal and beef.   Another Canadian variation, from Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, was composed entirely of veal.

9 servings

18 5 inch wood skewers

Cut into 1 X 1 1/2 inch pieces:

1 pound top sirloin steak

1 pound veal steak

1 pound pork steak

Sprinkle them with salt, pepper

Arrange the veal and pork, and beef  cubes alternately on 9 skewers. Roll the meat in flour.

Melt in a skillet 1/4 cup shortening (I like bacon fat here.  It just tastes better)

Add 1 tablespoon minced onion (optional)

Brown meat well. Cover the bottom of the skillet with heated stock. Put a lid on the skillet and braise the meat over mdeium heat until it is tender. Thicken the gravy with flour ( four tablespoons to one cup of stock.) If preferred, the skillet may be covered and placed in a slow oven 325 degrees F. Until the meat is tender.  Serve as shown or with wide egg noodles, or rice.

Serving Suggestion:

city chicken 2

Crock Pot Yankee Pot Roast

crock pot roast

Crock pot pot roast

2 pounds boneless beef roast
1 teaspoon vegetable oil
salt and pepper to taste
1 onion, quartered
16 baby carrots
1 (10.75 ounce) can condensed cream of mushroom soup
4 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley

4 russet potatoes peeled, and quartered
.
Directions

1.In a large skillet over medium high heat, saute the roast in the oil for 15 minutes, or until all sides are well browned. Season with salt and pepper to taste and set aside. (optional, Not neccessary to do, or may be done at night and just added to the crock pot in the morning with all the other ingredients)
2.Place the onion, carrots, garlic, potaotes and parsley in the bottom of a six quart slow cooker. Place the roast on top of the vegetables and pour the soup over the roast and the vegetables.
3.Cover the slow cooker and cook on low setting for 8 to 10 hours.
4.Transfer roast to a serving platter and place the vegetables around it. Pour the roast gravy from the slow cooker into a gravy boat.

Chicken with Mozzarella Diabetic Friendly!

Chicken with Mozzarella Diabetic Friendly!

Smoked mozzarella and spinach are rolled into chicken breasts that are coated in bread crumbs for this main dish recipe, which is perfect for entertaining.  I’ve included the Nutritional facts for you to see how healthy this really is for everybody!

YIELD: 6 chicken rolls

 

chicken with mozz

 

Nutrition Facts per Serving:

CARB GRAMS PER SERVING: 6

Calories: 274

Protein(gm): 35

Carbohydrate(gm): 6

Fat, total(gm): 11

Cholesterol(mg): 77

Saturated fat(gm): 3

Dietary Fiber, total(gm): 1

Vitamin A(IU): 1895

Vitamin C(mg): 4

Sodium(mg): 368

Calcium(DV %): 182

Iron(DV %): 1

Diabetic Exchanges

Vegetables(d.e): 2

Very Lean Meat(d.e): 5

Fat(d.e): 1

6 skinless, boneless chicken breast halves (1 1/2 pounds)

Salt

Black pepper

1/4 cup finely chopped shallots or onions

1 clove garlic, minced

2 teaspoons olive oil

1/2 10 ounce package frozen chopped spinach, thawed and well drained

3 tablespoons pine nuts or walnuts, toasted

3/4 cup shredded smoked mozzarella cheese (3 ounces)

1/4 cup seasoned fine dry bread crumbs

1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese

1 tablespoon olive oil

1. Place 1 chicken breast half between 2 pieces of plastic wrap. Pound lightly with the flat side of a meat mallet into a rectangle about 1/8 inch thick. Remove plastic wrap. Season with salt and pepper. Repeat with all chicken breasts.

2. For filling, in a medium skillet cook shallots and garlic in the 2 teaspoons hot oil until tender. Remove from heat; stir in spinach, nuts, and smoked mozzarella. In a shallow bowl combine bread crumbs and Parmesan cheese.

3. Place 2 to 3 tablespoons of filling on each chicken breast. Fold in the bottom and sides; then roll up. Secure with wooden toothpicks.

4. Lightly brush each roll with the 1 tablespoon olive oil; coat with bread crumb mixture. Place rolls seam side down in a shallow baking pan. Bake, uncovered, in a 400 degrees F; oven about 25 minutes or until chicken is no longer pink (170 degrees F). Remove toothpicks before serving. Makes 6 chicken rolls.

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